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Faculty Guide to the Rohrbach Library: Information Literacy

Current services and contacts at the Rohrbach Library

Information Literacy

What is Information literacy? Information Literacy (IL) is the set of integrated abilities encompassing the reflective discovery of information, the understanding of how information is produced and valued, and the use of information in creating new knowledge and participating ethically in communities of learning.

The other two tabs at the top of this box give more information about IL, including assessment information. 

To link to our full Information Literacy Guide, go to: https://library.kutztown.edu/il

MISSION of IL at KU: 

Based on the ACRL Standards and Framework for Information Literacy, Kutztown University Goals, and the Kutztown University Student Learning Outcomes, Rohrbach Library’s Information Literacy Program aims to increasingly develop students’ information literacy skills to prepare them for their future careers and lifelong learning. Information literate students possess the set of integrated abilities encompassing the reflective discovery of information, the understanding of how information is produces and valued, and the use of information in creating new knowledge and participating ethically in communities of learning.  

ACRL Framework's Six Core Information Literacy Concepts

The Association of College and Research Libraries' Information Literacy Framework and Standards

1. Scholarship as a Conversation

Communities of scholars, researchers, or professionals engage in sustained discourse with new insights and discoveries occurring over time as a result of varied perspectives and interpretations.

2. Research as Inquiry

Research is iterative and depends on asking increasingly complex or new questions whose answers in turn develop additional questions or lines of inquiry within or between disciplines.

3. Searching as Strategic Exploration

Searching for information is often nonlinear, requiring the evaluation of a range of information sources and the mental flexibility to pursue alternate avenues as new understanding develops. It requires using various search strategies, depending on the sources, scope, and context of the information need.

4. Authority is Constructed and Contextual

Information sources reflect their creators’ expertise and credibility. Sources should be evaluated based on the information need, the context in which the information was created, and how the information will be used. Authority is constructed in that various communities may recognize different types of authority. It is contextual in that the information need may help to determine the level of authority required.

5. Information Creation as a Process

Information in any format is produced to convey a message and is shared via a selected delivery method. The iterative processes of researching, creating, revising, and disseminating information vary, and the resulting product reflects these differences.

6. Information Has Value

Information possess several dimensions of value, including as a commodity, as a means of education, as a means to influence, and as a means of negotiating and understanding the world. Legal and socioeconomic interests influence information production, dissemination, and access.

Librarians and faculty will assess student learning related to IL based on class assignments and exercises. 

University-level assessment for information literacy focuses on the General Education Assessment Committee’s (GEAC) Student Learning Outcomes. The Information Literacy component is SLO #5. The next time this SLO will be assessed by GEAC is in Fall 2023. 

GEAC SLO #5:

  • "Demonstrate the ability to retrieve, interpret, evaluate, and use information. Definition: Information literate students possess the set of integrated abilities encompassing the reflective discovery of information, the understanding of how information is produced and valued, and the use of information in creating new knowledge and participating ethically in communities of learning. This SLO is met in General Education FYS: Discovering College and A: Communicating with and About the World” 
  • Uses this assessment rubric

SLOs related to IL in Rohrbach Library’s Strategic Plan:

  1. Effectively define their information needs 

  2. Access appropriate information using effective, well-designed search strategies 

  3. Define different types of authority and determine credibility through an understanding of authority, validity, accuracy, timeliness, and bias 

  4. Address gaps or weaknesses in gathered information and synthesize ideas gathered from multiple sources 

  5. Draw reasonable conclusions based on an analysis and interpretation of information to achieve a specific purpose with clarity and depth 

  6. Use appropriate attributions and citations 

  7. Demonstrate an understanding of ethical and legal restrictions on the use of information (ex: copyright, fair use, open access, and the public domain) 

  Rohrbach Library’s Strategic Plan